Nile Agreement

As for the major problem, which depends on the general terms of the agreement, it is worth recalling: despite decades of concerted efforts, no comprehensive agreement has ever been reached between the 11 countries that share the Nile river basin. But after rigorous discussions in the United States, Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan made a joint statement setting the framework for a final agreement. The three countries agreed that the dam would be filled in stages and that it would only take place during the rainy season. In 1999, the riparian countries [1], with the exception of Eritrea, signed the Nile Basin Initiative (NBI) to improve cooperation in the exploitation of “common water resources of the Nile basin”. Under the auspices of the NBI, riparian countries have begun to develop what they see as a sustainable legal and institutional framework for the management of the Nile Basin. Cairo has been privileged over other riparian countries as an important agricultural property. In addition, the Suez Canal, operated by Egypt, was essential to British imperial ambitions. “To the Italian Government: the fact that you have reached an agreement and the fact that you consider it necessary to send us a joint notification of this agreement clearly show that your intention is to exert pressure and we believe that this immediately raises an earlier issue. . . .